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Lwanga to Create Jobs & Develop Town Houses in Kenya Through KUP

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From Left: Jennifer of KCB Bank, Rose of Worcester, Shose of KCB Bank and Lwanga of Worcester during KCB Bank visit to Worcester. From Left: Jennifer of KCB Bank, Rose of Worcester, Shose of KCB Bank and Lwanga of Worcester during KCB Bank visit to Worcester.

Lwanga Njoroge knows firsthand how important a job and a house is. As Kenyans started settling in Worcester City in the late 90’s and 2000’s he would put in resources to help many Kenyans search for jobs. Today he is among the Kenyans who are part of Kenya University Project (KUP) who are putting in resources to create jobs in Kenya. “I know many Kenyans will be happy once they get jobs,” said Lwanga.

Lwanga opened a KCB Bank account to channel his capital into Town Houses development. Thinking of all the houses with clean water, energy and sanitary facilities that Diaspora Kenyans in Worcester live in, Lwanga is happy to be developing houses so as to provide housing for Kenyans. 

The fact is, most of the Diaspora Kenyans on arrival in the U.S were not rich persons with money that could instantly build a house or even rent a house. It was because someone got a job to go to and get paid that they were able to live to live in the cities with jobs and houses.  

Lwanga thanked the Diaspora scholars, WPI, KCB Bank and all Diaspora who shall play a role in the creation of jobs and development of residential town houses in Diaspora University Town. He said, “I will play my part of developing town houses.”  

Becoming a KUP Town House developer requires someone to sign a KUP-Town House Investment & Development Agreement (KUP-THIDA). Per terms set in the THIDA, the KUP property developer puts in the capital to be allocated a plot in the Diaspora University Town land. The university trust thereafter arranges for the development of the house through the Kenya loan advances.    

Lwanga was also happy to meet the KCB Bank team of Jennifer Chege and Shose Kombe. He was happy to learn that KCB Bank loan advances grew from Kshs 96 billion in 2009; this loan advances have increased to Kshs 353 billion by 2016; and are projected to grow to Kshs 700 billion by 2021 in just KCB bank. “I’m ready to be a developer and tap this money, and have a second source of income,” said Lwanga. 

DUT
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