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Should Media be 100% Accurate?

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President Uhuru Kenyatta, Members of Executive & Members of Press at World Press Day at KICC. President Uhuru Kenyatta, Members of Executive & Members of Press at World Press Day at KICC.

Sean Pentu commenting on accuracy of media that President Uhuru Kenyatta asked for, writes, “Its just words, are you scared of them, the courts are open to you if that's the case...DON'T MESS WITH PRESS FREEDOM, we elected you to concentrate on service delivery please do not fix what doesn't need fixing...the newspapers are controlled by economic forces newspaper only print what people are willing to read...so no dictatorship.” Indeed media in many developed economies is classified based on factual media (news journals) and entertainment (tabloid.) Public through their God given instincts have been able to distinguish between fact and fiction.

Comments based on President Uhuru Kenyatta concern.

John Kerera:  Some of the comments are really wanting. Doesn't the head of state have a right to give his opinion on media matters. The media have not only once, gone on to post stories which can best be said to have come from the bottom of a bottle. Misleading information has negative consequences. I believe ethical journalism strives to give the truth.

Cnjuguna: We do not need threats...uhuru is trying to intimidate the media shame on him...they print what Kenyans want to read!!

Sean Pentu: Its just words, are you scared of them, the courts are open to you if that's the case...DON'T MESS WITH PRESS FREEDOM, we elected you to concentrate on service delivery please do not fix what doesn't need fixing...the newspapers are controlled by economic forces newspaper only print what people are willing to read...so no dictatorship

Sensible: Information is such important and powerful that it should be conveyed diligently, accurately and without fear. Media should also realise that words cannot be retrieved once dispatched, irrespective of the apology magnitude.

Daniel mwaniki:  The media should take it as a polite advice from the president instead of taking it as a war against it. No worth media house would condone, defend or protect irresponsible journalism, if the writer is not sure of the truth of the story it should and must not be let go in the air for many people's lives have been destroyed by irresponsible journalism. No amount of apology would heal a broken spirit

GREGORY M: Media should be free but in a country where journalists have no time for due diligence, reckless media falls under slander and libel laws of the land. Know your facts, not gossip before you publish

ThebullJ: Uhuru was impolite to use this ocassion for his issues with media...especially the tone......I would like journalists to be deligent in their work....I think what he and the CS did was beneath them.

Jabranpin: Kenya's media is interested in only making the Kenya government look bad. You never see the British media, considered by civil society to be the paragon of the fourth estate, attack its own government with as much viciousness. How about reporting the good too?

Bundibundi: I think Kenyatta is threatening the media. Leave the media alone. That era of Nyayo In 90s has been overtaken by events. I remember when similar words were spoken by Mtukufu Rais back in 90s. Let Media Freedom ring everywhere in Kenya. Does he want to see what's in the papers before they are printed? After checking and checking on the story does he want journalists to twist it to favor his serikali? Let me not comment any further.

Believe in You: I agree with the President on this. The media industry is obsessed with eye-catching headlines that are aimed at eliciting and stirring emotions from the readers and in the process misleading them en masse. I am a true believer of press freedom, but unfortunately many people think that as a journalist you can say anything and get away with it. The role of the media should be, among others, to educate its readers. I am personally outraged by how the media has been reporting on Anglo-Leasing story. If you only depended on the Kenya media for news relating to Anglo-Leasing you would be fully convinced that the Kenya government wants to throw away taxpayers money because that is how it is presented to Kenyans. What is lacking is the basic history and full analysis of Anglo-Leasing. What the media has concentrated on is the political-related areas of the story. What is lacking is an extensive economic analysis. I realize that the media is responsible for keeping the government in check but that does not mean maligning, undermining, and misreporting. If I may add something, can the media houses please improve on their editing. There has been all kinds of issues ranging from misspellings to poor grammar lately. That only means that either someone is sleeping on their job or they have the wrong job.

PAUL OTIENO ONYANGO: I am fearing that Kenya is becoming another Venezuela where the government displays photos and videos accusing the Media of distortioning information. How I wish Uhuru could be the President of Colombian in Latin America, I think he would close down all media houses. Let somebody tell Uhuru a simple fact, give the information to the public and everybody will be ok. But remember world it is known that governments always try to give information which they think will favour them, and so the media exists to prevent such a situation by bringing to light of day some of the information that the government do not want to give to the publish.

 

Upende_Usipende: The start of the big fall. You cannot fight the media. As a politician, you'll always need to be on the good side of media.

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